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ASME MH1

2005 Edition, November 30, 2005

Complete Document

Pallets, Slip Sheets, and Other Bases for Unit Loads

Includes all amendments and changes through Change/Amendment , November 30, 2005


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Product Details:

  • Revision: 2005 Edition, November 30, 2005
  • Published Date: November 30, 2005
  • Status: Historical
  • Document Language: English
  • Published By: ASME International (ASME)
  • Page Count: 182
  • ANSI Approved: Yes
  • DoD Adopted: Yes

Description / Abstract:

FOREWORD

Hundreds of millions of wood pallets were manufactured in the United States of America during each of the past 30 years, considerably more than the 37 million pallets produced during 1953 when the ASME Standards Committee MH1 was established. It is estimated that approximately 20% of the total annual production of lumber in the United States was required for the assembly of these pallets. One pallet size of the approximately 100 sizes used, the 48 x 40 in. and 40 x 48 in. (1219 x 1016 mm and 1016 x 1219 mm) size, accounts for more than one-third of all the pallets produced; while ten additional sizes account for more than 1% of all pallets produced. Pallets made of metal, paper, and plastics are also manufactured in the United States. However, their production is limited and no production statistics are available.

The need for standardization of pallets used in the unit-load method of assembling, stacking, storing, handling, and transporting materials and products, originated from the interconnecting nature of pallet usage. The great variety of pallet sizes and constructions restricted their movement through manufacturing and distributing channels. This variety was the result of each user treating pallet design as a private problem. More intense application of the unit-load method of assembling, stacking, storing, handling, and transporting of commodities in the United States and in international trade fostered extensive use of pallets both as captive and exchange pallets. The latter pallets, especially, required maximum standardization for any exchange to be successful.

Some industries and military services developed, by evolution, certain pallet standards to solve specific problems which are also existent with other users. Consequently, their sizes and constructions of pallets established a pattern of value to all users.

The American National Standards Institute (formerly the American Standards Association) project on pallet standardization was initiated in October 1953. A Material Handling Standards Committee, MH1 (initially B69), was organized to coordinate information and prepare standards under the scope of standardization of nomenclature, types, sizes, materials, and components of pallets, including sampling, inspection, and test procedures. The standards pertain to pallets used in the unit-load method of assembling, stacking, storing, handling, and transporting materials and products. The standards were to accomplish the following:

(a) define terminology associated with pallets;

(b) apply to pallets irrespective of components used in their fabrication;

(c) provide a series of recommended pallet dimensions;

(d) describe procedures for pallet testing; and

(e) indicate procedures for designating pallet requirements.

During 1967, the MH1 Committee was reorganized. A Nominating Committee was established in compliance with the procedures of ANSI. The Nominating Committee selected officers for the MH1 Committee during 1968 and, in turn, became the nucleus for the new MH1 Executive Committee to guide the continuing revision activities and organize the task groups to be formed.

The name of the MH1 Committee was changed in 1979 to Standardization of Pallets, Slip Sheets, and Other Bases for Unit Loads by action of ANSI’s Physical Distribution Standards Management Board in light of the establishment of the MH1 Subcommittee on Standardization of Slip Sheets in March 1979. The following scope of the Committee was established: standardization of nomenclature, types, sizes, materials, and components of pallets, slip sheets, and other unit load bases, including sampling, inspection, and test procedures.

The MH1 Committee, consisting of individual members and representatives of trade associations, engineering societies, and government agencies, organized a Technical Committee to perform its work. During July 1981, this Technical Committee was reorganized as an ASME Standards Committee operating under the ANSI accredited organization procedures.

The following MH1 Committee standards were issued:

MH1.1.2 Definitions and Terminology Covering Pallets and Related Structures

MH1.2.2M Pallet Sizes

MH1.4.1M Procedures for Testing Pallets

MH1.5M Slip Sheets

MH1.6 Standard Procedures for Determination of Durability of Wooden Pallets and Related Structures

MH1.7M Driven Fasteners for Assembly of Pallets and Related Structures

MH1.8M Wood Pallets

MH1.9 Export Pallets

The MH1 Committee published the above eight separate standards consolidated into a single publication, MH1 Pallets, Slip Sheets, and Other Bases for Unit Loads. The 1997 Edition contained the consolidation of the revised MH1.1.2, MH1.4M (formerly MH1.4.1M), MH1.6, and MH1.7M standards. All of the documents contained in the previous Edition of the Standard were approved by ANSI as American National Standards on July 16, 1996.

The first addenda to the previous Edition added the remaining four standards to be consolidated into MH1. Part 2, the revised MH1.2.2, was approved by ANSI on August 6, 1998. Part 3, the revised MH1.8, was approved on August 6, 1998. Part 4, the revised MH1.9, was approved on January 30, 1998. Part 8, the revised MH1.5M, received approval on August 6, 1998. In addition, the military-specific Part 9, entitled “Wood Pallets for U.S. Government Use,” was developed by the MH1 Committee in response to the Government’s need to use voluntary standards. This final Part was approved by ANSI on February 4, 1999.

The second addenda to the previous Edition added Part 10 and revisions to Parts 3, 8, and 9. Part 10 was approved by ANSI on January 19, 2000. Revisions to Part 9 were approved by ANSI on June 7, 2000.

This Edition incorporates changes in all parts and the addition of a new Part 6. This Standard was approved by ANSI on August 28, 2003, and on March 9, 2005.