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ASTM D2520

2013 Edition, May 1, 2013

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Standard Test Methods for Complex Permittivity (Dielectric Constant) of Solid Electrical Insulating Materials at Microwave Frequencies and Temperatures to 1650 Degrees C

Includes all amendments and changes through Reinstatement Notice , May 1, 2013


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Product Details:

  • Revision: 2013 Edition, May 1, 2013
  • Published Date: May 1, 2013
  • Status: Active, Most Current
  • Document Language: English
  • Published By: ASTM International (ASTM)
  • Page Count: 17
  • ANSI Approved: No
  • DoD Adopted: No

Description / Abstract:

These test methods cover the determination of relative (Note 1) complex permittivity (dielectric constant and dissipation factor) of nonmagnetic solid dielectric materials.

NOTE 1—The word "relative" is often omitted.

Test Method A is for specimens precisely formed to the inside dimension of a waveguide.

Test Method B is for specimens of specified geometry that occupy a very small portion of the space inside a resonant cavity.

Test Method C uses a resonant cavity with fewer restrictions on specimen size, geometry, and placement than Test Methods A and B.

Although these methods are used over the microwave frequency spectrum from around 0.5 to 50.0 GHz, each octave increase usually requires a different generator and a smaller test waveguide or resonant cavity.

Tests at elevated temperatures are made using special high-temperature waveguide and resonant cavities.

This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.