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Cosmetics and Dermatologic Problems and Solutions

3rd Edition, September 1, 2011

Complete Document



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Active, Most Current

EN
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ISBN: 978-1-84184-741-2
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Product Details:

  • Revision: 3rd Edition, September 1, 2011
  • Published Date: September 1, 2011
  • Status: Active, Most Current
  • Document Language: English
  • Published By: CRC Press (CRC)
  • Page Count: 294
  • ANSI Approved: No
  • DoD Adopted: No

Description / Abstract:

Introduction

As the understanding of skin, hair, and nail physiology has evolved, so too has the design of products to enhance the appearance of these external structures. This book is designed to aid the dermatologist in understanding and utilizing these products in daily practice. The book is organized first by structure in terms of the skin, hair, and nails. This layout was selected because dermatologists are the medical experts in charge of disease and appearance issues related to the skin, hair, and nails. After reading this book, the dermatologist should have a fundamental understanding of the formulation, application, side effects, and issues of special interest as related to nonprescription products to maintain and enhance appearance. All the products discussed are in the over-the-counter realm, not traditionally covered by dermatology textbooks. Yet, the maintenance of healthy skin, hair, and nails is accomplished solely by the use of over-the-counter products, which makes the reading of this book important. The dermatologists must learn to make recommendations and identify problems related to over-the-counter products.

Within the broad topics of skin, hair, and nails, there are several subdivisions. Skin is broken down into body areas of face and body. Great distinctions exist because the facial skin is adorned with colored cosmetics, whereas the body is only cleansed and moisturized; however, the control of armpit perspiration is also important. Differences between female and male skin needs, considering all variations of skin color, are explored and the products used for hygiene are also evaluated. The book goes a step further by discussing the use of cosmetics and skin care products in common, cosmetically relevant skin disease, such as acne, eczema, rosacea, and sensitive skin. Further, skin can be distinguished by age and the amount of oil production. All these variables influence cleanser and moisturizer selection while providing opportunities for manufacturers to customize formulations. These formulations are presented to better understand the subtle differences between the myriad of customized products that are available for purchase.

Within the face, there are unique hygiene and product application areas. The eyes are elaborately adorned with color cosmetics, but represent a sensitive skin area with a junction between cornified skin and mucosa. A similar junction exists around the mouth, but the vermillion is also adorned with lip cosmetics and subject to the trauma of speaking and chewing. The ears are discussed with attention to the health of the ear canal and earlobe. Finally, the face must be considered in terms of photoprotection needs to prevent both painful sunburn and photoaging. Sunscreens can be used as separate products or applied through moisturizers, facial foundations, or powders. Cosmetics can provide functionality beyond adornment through photoprotection.

Aesthetic issues of facial scarring, asymmetries, and the care of post-surgical facial skin are tackled, since there are needs for an understanding of camouflaging techniques. The use of artistic color to improve appearance through recontouring and the minimization of scarring with opaque cosmetics is part of the knowledge base of the dermatologist. Proper use of cosmetics can enhance patient satisfaction with healing following an invasive procedure or the final skin appearance after an incisional surgery.

Even though the hair and nails are nonliving structures, they are of tremendous cosmetic value. Hair grooming issues, such as shampooing and conditioning, for all types of hair architectures are important to hair appearance and also for the maintenance of scalp health following treatment of seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, postmenopausal dry scalp, and the alopecias. Improper hair styling procedures and products may cause hair breakage and loss, requiring special discussion, along with hair dyeing, permanent waving, and straightening. The chemistry behind hair cosmetic manipulations is complex and damaging to the unique keratin structure of the hair shaft. The desire for appearance alterations must be balanced with hair health, which sometimes requires compromise on the part of the patient. While abundant hair growth is desirable on the scalp, it is undesirable on the female face, armpits, and legs. This book also covers issues of hirsutism and hair removal options.

Nails are also addressed both from a functional and cosmetic standpoint. Brittle nails, nails in children, and toenails are discussed along with the use of nail cosmetics from polishes to prostheses. Nail health can be affected by improper grooming procedures and cosmetic elongation manipulations, but nail disease also be improved with the use of nail cosmetics. In short, this book covers all aspects of cosmetic dermatology presented in a fashion that allows the dermatologist to use this material in everyday practice. This problem-oriented approach is not found in any other textbook on the subject and is a new addition to the third edition. When the first edition of this book was published some 20 years ago in 1990, a more encyclopedic approach was taken because it was the first book of its kind in dermatology to address the area of cosmetics.

In short, this book covers all aspects of cosmetic dermatology presented in a fashion that allows the dermatologist to use this material in everyday practice. This problem-oriented approach is not found in any other textbook on the subject and is a new addition to the third edition. When the first edition of this book was published some 20 years ago in 1990, a more encyclopedic approach was taken because it was the first book of its kind in dermatology to address the area of cosmetics. It was a paperback book with a few tables and line drawings. The second edition of the book was launched in 1995 into hardback with more tables, but only a black on white layout. The third edition of this book in 2011 is hardback and in full color with numerous textboxes, images, and tables and a digital layout. The advancements in publishing technology have supplemented the advancements in cosmetics, which are showcased in this third edition. The 20-year evolution of this book represents my growth as a person, as a dermatologist, and as a teacher. It is the culmination of my passion for learning and sharing. I hope you can sense my enthusiasm for the subject and the joys I experienced while developing the material. Writing, after all, is a unique undertaking. It is done in silence with focused thought and vigilant hands tapping on the keyboard using borrowed moments in the far reaches of the globe in all time zones. This book is the culmination of ideas that zip across the subconscious brain unexpectedly only to find their way into a framework of organization and logic. It is my hope that you will find illumination and enjoyment while we share together an increased understanding of the place that cosmetics has in dermatology!